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Ohio parents sue in fatal

Published: 
Sunday, August 13, 2017
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Gabriel Taye Photo by:Irving Ward

CINCINNATI

The wrongful death lawsuit filed by the parents of Gabriel Taye against Cincinnati Public Schools and school officials cites repeated examples of Gabriel and others being bullied at his elementary school. They contend school officials knew about the bullying but were “deliberately indifferent,” allowing a “treacherous school environment.”

Knowledge of harassment and failure to do something are among elements set out in a 1999 US Supreme Court ruling for school liability cases.

“The deliberate indifference standard set forth (by the Supreme Court) sets a high bar for plaintiffs,” a 2016 opinion by a three-judge panel of the 6th US Circuit Court of Appeals says.

“It requires only that school administrators respond to known peer harassment in a manner that is not ‘clearly unreasonable in light of the known circumstances.’”

The ruling rejected an appeal by a Tennessee family that sued a school district over two years of alleged relentless bullying that forced their son to change schools.

Cincinnati school officials have said that the boy told staff he fainted the day his parents say Gabriel was knocked unconscious at a school bathroom and that he never said he was bullied or assaulted. He killed himself two days later, on January 26.

Legal experts say such lawsuits seem to be coming more common amid increasing public awareness campaigns on youth bullying. A 2015 federal survey estimated that about 21 per cent of US students, ages 12-18, said they had been bullied.

Federal authorities say they are still learning about the links between school bullying and suicide, saying bullying increases the risk of suicidal behaviour but that the majority of bullying cases don’t result in suicide, suicide attempts, or thoughts of suicide.

Courts have shown reluctance to increase the demands on school officials to quell bullying. The Supreme Court has urged courts against second-guessing school administrators’ disciplinary decisions, to allow them flexibility they need to deal with children who are still learning how to interact appropriately.

Plaintiffs in such cases have often said that among their reasons for going to court is the hope it will bring changes that will protect other students from bullying.

“We want to open a Pandora’s box, we want to push against the hornet’s nest,” said Bruce Nagel, attorney for the family of a 12-year-old New Jersey girl who killed herself in June, allegedly after months of bullying by classmates. “We want to end this forever.” (AP)